Strength and Stretching Guide For Cyclists

Cyclists typically get tight through their lower backs, hamstrings, hip flexors and glutes. Some of this muscle tension is caused by cycling, but a lot of the tension is caused by our modern lifestyles which involves too much time sitting in chairs.

Too much tension in any one of these muscles groups will cause an imbalance which will affect your comfort and efficiency on the bike.

In our experience, cyclists tend to overlook including any strength and stretching exercises in their regular weekly routine.  This can lead to weak glute muscles and general muscle imbalance, which in turn will affect your cycling performance.

To  help improve your cycling, we have created this essential guide for cyclists.

Download the Strength and Stretching Guide For Cyclists Now

The guide includes 5 essential exercises that every cyclist should do at least 2-3 times per week.

They only take between 5-10 minutes in total so there really is no excuse not to do them.

In the guide we cover some simple exercises to effectively engage your glutes.   Cyclists need strong glutes.  Gluteus Maximus is the biggest muscle in your body and its job while you are cycling is to push down on the pedals. Your smaller gluteal muscles help to keep your hips and pelvis stable while you ride.

 

Teaching your brain how to activate Glute Max is vital before you attempt to strengthen it, so watch this video to make sure your brain and your glutes have a good connection

 

A strong Gluteus Maximus is a great start, but definitely not the only thing to consider when it comes to your overall body maintenance.

Foam Rolling your quads, ITB and calves, is also highly effectively. Watch this video for a quick work out you can perform regularly.

 

If you are currently struggling with a niggle or injury book an appointment today to see one of our specialist physiotherapists. We will help get you back on the bike, feeling strong and comfortable, as soon as possible.

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